About your Search

20121112
20121120
STATION
KQED (PBS) 18
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
studying the b.p. case and the relationship between business and the environment. how important is today's set element -- settlement. >> this is the biggest story.no. we have more dollars at stake. >> in terms of how importantthil us a little more. it's a record settlement. but it does encompass quite a few different features. in addition to the felony charges there is the fec investigation and the resolution of that matter and that is a big deal. >> darren is saying it's notove. the government is bringing gross negligence charges against bp. bp is going to fight it vigorously how is that going to play out? >> it's difficult for them toave standard when they admitted to the felony charges. when it's related to the environment. it's some $20 billion this is a big story but it's an even bigger story ahead. >> there have been so many fines there a silver lining to all of this? does this make the deep water drilling safer going into the future? >> well it's certainly a goodstr investors and the shareholders will see the company in a greater light. brrchltbut unfortunately we aret going to se
to the regional community. nor is there in evanish to the environment. >> with some reports suggesting the great barrier reef is in danger, the australian government is making marine conservation a high agenda priority. creating parks in the ocean is one way that it believes that it can keep the pristine environments in tact. >>> there one of the world's best-selling artists. led zeppelin burst on to the music scene and the late 1960's and dominated the charts with their blues-infused it's such as "stairway to heaven." there are about to be honored in the u.s. at the kennedy center for transforming the sound of rock and roll and influencing other artists. led zeppelin split up in 1980. the perform a concert in 2007. what was it like getting back after all those years apart? legendary guitarist jimmy page has been talking to the bbc. >> there was a lot of preparation when we first did the first rehearsal. it was really exciting. everybody was trying to make it work. we needed to play in such a way that we all had confidence with each other. that needed -- that needed playing and getting to know e
where we all count on each other. it's a stimulating environment if you like change and rapid change, amazon is a great place to be. >> rose: beyond what you have said characterize the culture of amazon today. >> well, i would say that the culture of amazon starts with an externally facing culture looking at customers as our touchstone. so companies can be kind of competitor focused. and that approach can be successful. or i think they can art with the customer and that can also be successful. so some companies have kind of a conqueror mentality. if you look at their annual strategic plan it starts with their three top enemies and who they are going to crush this year. and some companies, and certainly amazon is in this group. we have an explorer mentality. so we like to go pioneering. we like to find dark alleyways and wander down them and see if they open up into broad avenues. and sometimes they do. with that pine earring exploring mentality is what drives us. the core of the culture. and over the years it's self-selecting. the people who thrive at amazon and stay at amazon and lo
were allowed a place at the proverbial table, that the environment was better, that their villages and communities were stronger economically, that their children were healthy, that there was literally no down side. everything changed and made a more stable community. and you realize when women are subjugated and treated as fodder of war, and in this country when they are not allowed to be paid equally, there is a real problem in that. and until we can fight and scream and kick and demand a change. and women not be slaughtered. that there were 100 million women missing off the planet. this is inequality here that must stop. and i became impassioned with it. and i have worked for people like eve -- who still is a hero. i urge people to go on the web site and see what she is doing for women to stand up and scream and be known that this has to change or vital voices, which is another very important group based in washington which helps empower women to go back into the community and spread it our and teach other women and change the world. tavis: you give me another opportunity to cir
time in this environment. >> rose: will they in the next five years be able to move this from the sort of exporting economy model to a domestic demand model? >> i mean, the distinction between reformers and conservatives is a bit of an artifice, everyone that is meaningful in china that runs the country knows that they have to shift and trance form the economy, but the fact that someone is in favor of reform does not mean they are in favor of free market reform. so clearly there is going to be a lot of interest in redistributing wealth and whether or not they can move on that is an open question. but trying to ensure that folks, more people get into the middle classes, there is less dissent and less dissatisfaction with their lot in life as growth in china slows. >> rose: can the communist party as it exists today in its closed way, how long does it have? >> i have an answer for that. as i think i have discussed with you before, charlie, one of the main impressions to me of living in china opposite things are always true, it is wonderful and horrible and uplifting and discouraging and
news group." paul rogers, environment writer for "san jose mercury news." and carla marinucci, "san francisco chronicle," senior political reporter. carla, you get to have all the fun. you were in chicago on tuesday night. tell us what was it like. were people surprised at the close, the short drama? >> well, you know, belva, we were in the snoechs the snoeno hampshire, you know how dramatic it was all the way through. just amazing to be there on that final night. this was a much different election night than 2008, when 250,000 people greeted this sort of landmark moment. barack obama is more weathered, he's -- >> belva: graying. >> graying, but boy, the -- the democrats there, it was just pandemonium. and i think -- this time, it was tears of relief. instead of joy. that this contest has been so tough, so expensive and so important in so many ways and we saw it so negative that i think people are glad it's over, but to be there and to watch the president give that address and we heard him today in washington talking about what happens now in this country. i think the republicans l
environment for stocks. >> that means you'll get some uneasiness extending into 2013. it won't have the cliff aspect at least in the first half of 2013. so, the can is kicked down the road. you'll have more like a simmering uneasiness waiting for washington to stay focus and arrive at a compromise. >> reporter: as to whether a solution on the fiscal cliff will result in a rally for stocks here on wall street. experts say the answer to that is yes. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, a major deadline gets pushed back for health insurance exchanges, a key part of president obama's health care reform. >> tom: lunch box staples for generations of kids could be history. hostess brands-- the maker of twinkies, ho-hos and wonder bread wants to sell everything to liquidate the company and go out of business. it's asking a bankruptcy court for permission. as diane eastabrook reports the move follows months of financial problems and labor un-rest. >> reporter: hostess brands says it decided to liquidate after a strike by members of the bakery, confectionery, tobacco workers, and g
for the pbs news hour. lauren sommer, science and environment reporter. and josh richman, bay area news group political reporter. josh, let's start with you. all of a sudden it seems like california, which was in the depths, is now rolling in money. and there's more taxes, we've passed proposition 30. i can't believe there's that much of a turn-around. is there? >> well, there is a turn-around. i wouldn't say we're rolling in money. i've never seen a state so happy to a $1.9 billion deficit over the next year and a half. that's basically where we're at. now, you have to look at that deficit, even though it's the size of wyoming's entire budget, in the context of a $42 billion deficit and $6 billion deficit, we've worn it down over time. with the passage of prop 30 last week, we have money coming in for the next several years to support education, k-12 education, college education and also to help out balancing out some of the mope that's needed by counties for the realignment of the criminal justice system. >> do you think prop 30 was the main reason that the deficit is lower? or is it the fa
not to destroy the world's environment, which they will do if other things being equal. and so we want to work with them on avoiding environmental just destruction. we want them to continue bringing people from rural poverty to sort of urban working classness, which is what they've been doing. we want them to grow up in both international and domestic ways. grow up internationally in having a foreign policy that's not just whatever's good for them commercially, which is what their foreign policy is now. and to say, "okay, you have to play a role in iran and syria or whatever, being responsible." domestically, we want them to gain confidence so they don't have to have their foot on their people's neck. most of the time in china you don't know the government's around. just kind of a sort of state of chaos -- >> really? >> and, yeah. >> i mean, not like russia, the soviet union -- >> oh, it's -- >> not that blanket -- >> entirely different. it's most of the time the areas the government cares about, the internet, democratic protest or whatever, taiwan, tibet, they're all over. when it doesn't inv
't know why the-- why the washington environment is a whole lot different. >> the other thing the president said was i'm not up for reelection again. so they look ahead, they see 2010 and think if taxes do go up for the middle class, it will be john boehner, and the republicans to take the blame. >> well, that may be but who is it going to play that kind of bluffing game with the debt ceiling because that's when you really risk tremendous market reactions and peril. i know you talked about david petraeus, and the whole foreign policy issue last night on charlie, martha, but do you-- let me ask you again, do you take seriously the notion that john kerry could be defense secretary? >> i think that was a trial balloon. >> you do? >> i 19, clearly both of those stories were trial balloons. president obama, obviously, took it a little further, quite a bit further today talking about susan rice. it was no longer a trial balloon. but i think john kerry-- you know, is that a consolation prize? i think he's probably always wanted to be secretary of state. i'm not sure how that would go
that climate change has little to do with the state of the environment, but much to do with the state of capitalism and transforming the american economic system and you see an opening with sandy, right? >> i do see an opening because, you know, whenever you have this kind of destruction there has to be a reconstruction and what i documented in the shock doctrine is that these right-wing think tanks leak the american enterprise institute and the cato institute and heritage foundation, they historically have gotten very, very good at seizing these moments of opportunity to push through their wish lists of policies and often their wish lists of policies, after hurricane katrina there was a meeting at the heritage foundation just two weeks after the storm hit. parts of the city were still under water and there was a meeting and "the wall street journal" reported from it and the heading was 31 free market solutions for hurricane katrina and you go down the list and it was -- don't re-open the public schools. replace the public schools with vouchers and drill for oil in anwar and the arcti
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)